Bird by bird

I hope Anne Lamott will forgive me for using the title of her book but this quote happens to be one of the most powerful message that I retained from it and the subject of today’s blog.

When you embark on a journey to write a book, it can be daunting. The idea of writing between 40,000 and 100,00 words can be enough to put off anyone. Except someone like me because I am a nerd. I hope you will forgive me.

How do you get over that daunting feeling? By tackling it in small bites. If you consider that an average page contains 300 words and you aim at writing a book with an average word count of 60,000, this means 200 pages. If you write one page per day, you will take approximately six months to get your first draft done. If you had more times on your hands, however, you could write two pages a day and you would have a book in a little over three months. I am being very approximative here but hey, writing is not an automated process. Although some writers claim to be able to do that but that’s another story all together.

This is where planning (structuring) your book can be a boon. Imagine if you took a few weeks to let the story develop in your head. You first focus on your main character and what it is exactly that he (or she) wants. You start defining his character, his life experience, where he lives, what he does for a living, whether he is single, straight, employed, etc. In fact most of your first week should be to delve into this person’s life to such extent that if you were interviewed about him for one hour, you would be able to answer any questions the interviewer shot at you as if it was your own life.

Then you need to bring to life a “villain”. Fiction is always about conflict. A villain is someone or something that will come in the way of your hero’s goal or aspiration. Supposed your main character was a woman of fifty years of age who had just been left by her husband for a younger woman and who aspired to be in a loving relationship again. Brave woman. Her villain might be the fact that she has seven children at home. It can make it a little more challenging to find a partner when you have that many children. But if you will forgive me a small digression, I listened to a phone in three years ago on BBC Bristol on Valentine Day, and heard the most beautiful love story ever of precisely that: a man who bumped his trolley into the trolley of a woman (who fitted this profile exactly) and who immediately fell in love with her and swore to look after her and her tribe until the day he died. They were happily married fifteen years later. Now that is a good story for a book. Don’t you think?

If, however, they met right away and eloped, that wouldn’t make a good book. There has to be a journey. Where would you start the book? Probably at the time she found out about her husband infidelity. Then you would plan the story’s outline and define thirty or more scenes with who is in it, what is the action for each scene (each scene has to contain its own little conflict). Perhaps initially our heroine would give her husband a second chance and he would mess it up.

You can see that by planning and slicing up your story in small chunks, it can make it a lot easier to write it because you then only commit to writing a few pages at a time. And this is where Anne Lamott’s title comes into it. It is an anecdote from her book when she tells her father that she can’t possibly learn all that there is to learn and feels overwhelmed. I have to admit I can’t remember precisely what her anecdote is about. And her father, who is a writer, tells her “bird by bird”, meaning take one bird at a time.

To your creativity

Ange de Lumiere

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